Data Leak: How to Keep Your Information Safe

By: Joni Boyd

It seems to be happening more and more often: companies being hacked, their customers’ details sold on the dark web.

Key points

  • Change your bank or credit card: “It’s an inconvenience, but it will provide some peace of mind.”
  • “One of the best things you can do is monitor your bank account and report any unusual activity.”
  • “Keep your guard up and take any SMS you receive with a grain of salt.”
  • “Don’t click on every link and read the URL carefully.”
  • “If you’ve ever needed a sign to change your passwords and set up multi-factor authentication, this could be it.”

Today the Department of Home Affairs has confirmed that Ticketmaster has had “a cybersecurity incident.”

In short, this means that anyone who has used the Ticketmaster system is at risk of having their personal information stolen.

Understandably, many people are concerned. Thankfully, there are some simple things we can all do to keep our information safe.

Leigh Stark, founder and editor of tech news site Pickr.com.au shares his top tips for anyone who may be worried about their personal information.

Consider changing your credit cards

“The biggest risk right now is probably the immediate use of credit card details, since those were part of the breach,” he said.

“Most people don’t want to actively change their bank or credit card, but if you’re concerned, you can definitely do that.

Change your bank or credit card: “It’s an inconvenience, but it will provide some peace of mind.”

“Yes, it’s an inconvenience, but it will provide some peace of mind.”

Watch your bank accounts

Leigh also advises people to keep an eye on their bank accounts in coming days and weeks.

“One of the best things you can do is monitor your bank account and report any unusual activity. Talk with your bank and make sure you have alerts set up, and if something happens, lock your account as soon as possible and report problems.”

Look out for phishing

Phishing is also of concern.

“The next biggest risk will be phishing,” Leigh said.

“Simply put, expect your phone number and email to be used for phishing scams. Keep your guard up and take any SMS you receive with a grain of salt.”

“Keep your guard up and take any SMS you receive with a grain of salt.”

“I expect fake websites to pop up aimed at “helping” victims of the breach, so it’ll be a good idea to keep an eye on messages you receive.”

Don’t click links

Leigh’s advice is something for us all to be aware of, every day, not just after a data breach:

“Don’t click on every link, and read the URL carefully. That’s typically how scammers trick people.”

Change your passwords

If all else fails, regularly changing your passwords is always a good idea.

“If you’ve ever needed a sign to change your passwords and set up multi-factor authentication, this could be it,” he said. “While this leak doesn’t include passwords, it’s not difficult for hackers to join the dots and attempt to break in using the details found in this breach.”


Article supplied with thanks to Hope Media.

Feature image: Photo by Towfiqu barbhuiya on Unsplash

About the Author: Joni Boyd is a writer, based in the Hawkesbury Region of NSW. She is passionate about the power of stories shared, to transform lives.

linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram